Social and New MEOWdia

To rehash the interviews, I have also included them and my paper edit in this final version.

INTERVIEW 1:

ME: How do you feel about Epling’s Service Center?

Erma: Well, let’s see. I don’t have a problem with it, I guess. It’s been there for quite some time and they always seem to have a lot of different cars there — bein’ worked on and things — yup…they seem to do real good business. I reckon I like ’em just fine then.

ME: Have you used it in the past 6 months?

Erma: No, now I can’t say I have, but my husband — Hey Jarrell, come in here a minute — now he goes to them every once in a while to get stuff done like oil and stickers and the like.

Jarrell: What you want woman? I’m tryna fix me some soup.

Erma: Oh hush up, old man and tell this nice girl about you gettin your car fixed up yonder at that service place.

Jarrell: Oh hell ,you mean ole Harold and Sonny’s place? Yeah them fellas are good guys. Always liked ’em. Done some car tradin’ with em back in the 80’s. Nowadays, well, I guess we just sit up there and talk about — damn — well everything. Get my piece of junk car stickered every year there. They do the best inspections. Real easy like. Just check the essentials and talk to ya like you’re a real person. Hell, I dunno what I’d do if they went out.

ME: Do you feel it’s brought the community together, then? Since you, you know, sit up there and talk to the owners and everything?

Jarrell: Oh goodness yes. Like I said, can’t imagine what I’d do without them fellas. The community….well….it’s definitely got a little bit more friendly with them around.

ME: That’s so great to hear! So, can you tell me then how much history do you know about Epling’s?

Erma: Well, if my memory serves me right it started back in –oh—back in 1980 somethin’.

Jarrell: Yeah. She’s right, 1980’s they started puttin’ her up. Owned, like I said, by Sonny and his dad Harold Epling from up around Ashford area. They’ve always been good with cars – that whole family.

INTERVIEW 2:

ME: How do you feel about Epling’s Service Center?

Frank: Oh I always liked Harold.  When Sonny opened the shop I started going down there for little stuff I needed done.  Like oil changes and stickers. Now sometimes, I stop by to see how things are goin’.

ME: Oh ok. So have you been there in the past 6 months?

Frank: I think I was there about July when my sticker run out.

ME: Oh ok, I gotcha. Did you have a good experience?

Frank: It was fine.

ME: Well that’s good to hear. Do you think, then, that this business has brought any good to the community?

Frank: Ah hell, I don’t know. I mean they’re good to get your car worked on and stuff, but I….I can’t really say what good it’s done.

ME: Thank you, Frank. I completely understand. So, how much history do you know about Epling’s?

Well Sonny opened the shop up about 30 years ago I think.  I stop in there when I’m headed down the road sometimes.

INTERVIEW 3:

ME: Can you tell me what you know or how you feel about Epling’s Service Center?

Jon: Epling’s opened in the late 1980s if I remember right….I think around 1988 or somewhere thereabouts. Sonny’s been in that same place ever since. I have had big engine work done there and basic oil changes, tires put on, and other stuff. I’ve known Sonny Epling for about 30 years he’s a straightforward feller that is not afraid to speak his mind….good or bad. But he is a great mechanic if he can’t fix it ain’t nobody gonna fix it. I’ve had only one or two bad experiences over the years usually when they told me something was gonna cost more than I thought it would be or somethin’ like that. Ain’t had anything worked on in ‘bout six months or so.

ME: That’s great you’ve had a lot of work done there and they do such a great job. Do you think this place has helped make the community a bit stronger?

Jon: Oh yeah. Every time I stop there I see somebody I know. It’s like a gathering center for some people to just stop by and say hi, or hang out and chat. Better not do that for too long, though. Sonny’ll throw ya out quicker than ya came in!

FINAL DRAFT OF COMMERCIAL

Visual Audio
1 Show SONNY and WORKERS greeting customers with handshakes and smiles.

In the background is the office.

SONNY leads them to the work area where their car is on a lift.

Happy, jaunty music playing in the background all the way through to the end.

Voice Over (VO): When you come in to Epling’s Service Center you will be greeted by smiling faces willing to help you with your automobile needs.

2 Shot of men sitting around talking and laughing in the office. VO: It’s not only about the work, however. It’s about connecting with the community.
3 CU shot of each man going around the room with happy, red faces. MAN 1: Every time I stop there I see somebody I know. It’s like a gathering center for some people to just stop by and say hi, or hang out and chat.

MAN 2: When Sonny opened the shop I started going down there for little stuff I needed done.  Like oil changes and stickers. Now sometimes, I stop by to see how things are goin’.

4 Show SONNY et al working together to put a tire on or look under a car on the lift. VO: Started in 1988, the company has been continuing to gain community support and grow. It thrives from the customers and loyal support of each member of the community to give it life.

MAN 1: Epling’s opened in the late 1980s if I remember right….I think around 1988 or somewhere thereabouts. Sonny’s been in that same place ever since.

MAN 3: The community….well….it’s definitely got a little bit more friendly with them around.

5 Show SONNY working on cars and giving direction to other workers on what needs to be done. VO: And not only does he help bring the community to life, but he does some of the finest work around.

MAN 3: They do the best inspections. I dunno what I’d do if they went out.

MAN 1: He is a great mechanic if he can’t fix it ain’t nobody gonna fix it.

6 Shot of front of store with overlaying logo. VO: Epling’s Service Center. (PUT SONG BIRD HERE!)

FINAL DRAFT OF COMMERCIAL

Visual Audio
1 Reenactment of ERMA and JARRELL in their home giving part of this interview about Epling’s Service Center.

ERMA sitting in arm chair, looking over her shoulder to speak to JARRELL.

JARRELL is heard off screen but not seen.

ERMA: Hey Jarrell, come in here a minute.

JARRELL: What you want woman? I’m tryna fix me some soup.

ERMA: Oh hush up, old man and tell this nice girl about you gettin your car fixed up yonder at that service place.

2 JARRELL comes into the room carrying a bowl of soup and crackers. JARRELL: Yeah them fellas are good guys. Always liked ’em. They do the best inspections.
3 Show SONNY talking to JARRELL next to his car.

Shot from inside the car at the two men with the sticker in plain view.

JARRELL: Real easy like. Just check the essentials and talk to ya like you’re a real person.

 

Old photograph of Epling’s when it first opened and it being built. JON: Epling’s opened in the late 1980s if I remember right….I think around 1988 or somewhere thereabouts. Sonny’s been in that same place ever since. He is a great mechanic if he can’t fix it ain’t nobody gonna fix it.
4 New shot of JON at Epling’s Service Center standing outside greeting FRANK.

JON and FRANK side by side talking and laughing with each other. SONNY walks up and greets the two men as well.

FRANK: When Sonny opened the shop I started going down there for little stuff I needed done.  Like oil changes and stickers. Now sometimes, I stop by to see how things are goin’.

JON: Every time I stop there I see somebody I know. It’s like a gathering center for some people to just stop by and say hi, or hang out and chat.

5 Show SONNY working on cars and giving direction to other workers on what needs to be done. JARRELL: The community….well….it’s definitely got a little bit more friendly with them around.
6 Shot of front of store with overlaying logo. VO: Epling’s Service Center. That place makes this place more friendly.
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To rehash the interviews, I have also included them and my paper edit in this final version.

INTERVIEW 1:

ME: How do you feel about Epling’s Service Center?

Erma: Well, let’s see. I don’t have a problem with it, I guess. It’s been there for quite some time and they always seem to have a lot of different cars there — bein’ worked on and things — yup…they seem to do real good business. I reckon I like ’em just fine then.

ME: Have you used it in the past 6 months?

Erma: No, now I can’t say I have, but my husband — Hey Jarrell, come in here a minute — now he goes to them every once in a while to get stuff done like oil and stickers and the like.

Jarrell: What you want woman? I’m tryna fix me some soup.

Erma: Oh hush up, old man and tell this nice girl about you gettin your car fixed up yonder at that service place.

Jarrell: Oh hell ,you mean ole Harold and Sonny’s place? Yeah them fellas are good guys. Always liked ’em. Done some car tradin’ with em back in the 80’s. Nowadays, well, I guess we just sit up there and talk about — damn — well everything. Get my piece of junk car stickered every year there. They do the best inspections. Real easy like. Just check the essentials and talk to ya like you’re a real person. Hell, I dunno what I’d do if they went out.

ME: Do you feel it’s brought the community together, then? Since you, you know, sit up there and talk to the owners and everything?

Jarrell: Oh goodness yes. Like I said, can’t imagine what I’d do without them fellas. The community….well….it’s definitely got a little bit more friendly with them around.

ME: That’s so great to hear! So, can you tell me then how much history do you know about Epling’s?

Erma: Well, if my memory serves me right it started back in –oh—back in 1980 somethin’.

Jarrell: Yeah. She’s right, 1980’s they started puttin’ her up. Owned, like I said, by Sonny and his dad Harold Epling from up around Ashford area. They’ve always been good with cars – that whole family.

INTERVIEW 2:

ME: How do you feel about Epling’s Service Center?

Frank: Oh I always liked Harold.  When Sonny opened the shop I started going down there for little stuff I needed done.  Like oil changes and stickers. Now sometimes, I stop by to see how things are goin’.

ME: Oh ok. So have you been there in the past 6 months?

Frank: I think I was there about July when my sticker run out.

ME: Oh ok, I gotcha. Did you have a good experience?

Frank: It was fine.

ME: Well that’s good to hear. Do you think, then, that this business has brought any good to the community?

Frank: Ah hell, I don’t know. I mean they’re good to get your car worked on and stuff, but I….I can’t really say what good it’s done.

ME: Thank you, Frank. I completely understand. So, how much history do you know about Epling’s?

Well Sonny opened the shop up about 30 years ago I think.  I stop in there when I’m headed down the road sometimes.

INTERVIEW 3:

ME: Can you tell me what you know or how you feel about Epling’s Service Center?

Jon: Epling’s opened in the late 1980s if I remember right….I think around 1988 or somewhere thereabouts. Sonny’s been in that same place ever since. I have had big engine work done there and basic oil changes, tires put on, and other stuff. I’ve known Sonny Epling for about 30 years he’s a straightforward feller that is not afraid to speak his mind….good or bad. But he is a great mechanic if he can’t fix it ain’t nobody gonna fix it. I’ve had only one or two bad experiences over the years usually when they told me something was gonna cost more than I thought it would be or somethin’ like that. Ain’t had anything worked on in ‘bout six months or so.

ME: That’s great you’ve had a lot of work done there and they do such a great job. Do you think this place has helped make the community a bit stronger?

Jon: Oh yeah. Every time I stop there I see somebody I know. It’s like a gathering center for some people to just stop by and say hi, or hang out and chat. Better not do that for too long, though. Sonny’ll throw ya out quicker than ya came in!

FINAL DRAFT OF COMMERCIAL

Visual Audio
1 Show SONNY and WORKERS greeting customers with handshakes and smiles.

In the background is the office.

SONNY leads them to the work area where their car is on a lift.

Happy, jaunty music playing in the background all the way through to the end.

Voice Over (VO): When you come in to Epling’s Service Center you will be greeted by smiling faces willing to help you with your automobile needs.

2 Shot of men sitting around talking and laughing in the office. VO: It’s not only about the work, however. It’s about connecting with the community.
3 CU shot of each man going around the room with happy, red faces. MAN 1: Every time I stop there I see somebody I know. It’s like a gathering center for some people to just stop by and say hi, or hang out and chat.

MAN 2: When Sonny opened the shop I started going down there for little stuff I needed done.  Like oil changes and stickers. Now sometimes, I stop by to see how things are goin’.

4 Show SONNY et al working together to put a tire on or look under a car on the lift. VO: Started in 1988, the company has been continuing to gain community support and grow. It thrives from the customers and loyal support of each member of the community to give it life.

MAN 1: Epling’s opened in the late 1980s if I remember right….I think around 1988 or somewhere thereabouts. Sonny’s been in that same place ever since.

MAN 3: The community….well….it’s definitely got a little bit more friendly with them around.

5 Show SONNY working on cars and giving direction to other workers on what needs to be done. VO: And not only does he help bring the community to life, but he does some of the finest work around.

MAN 3: They do the best inspections. I dunno what I’d do if they went out.

MAN 1: He is a great mechanic if he can’t fix it ain’t nobody gonna fix it.

6 Shot of front of store with overlaying logo. VO: Epling’s Service Center. (PUT SONG BIRD HERE!)

The Content Points from the Paper Given

  1. Soldiers often pride themselves on their ability to take care of problems on their own. But it doesn’t always work.
  2. That’s when the leader needs to step in. Being a leader means caring for other soldiers, being aware of the stresses they’re under, and doing something about it.
  3. Families are a soldier’s best support. But when there’s a problem in the family, the soldier’s work is going to suffer, and the unit may suffer as a result.
  4. An Army unit is a very special thing. It’s like a family.

The Basic/Rough Script

VISUALS AUDIO
1 Shot of infantry soldiers patrolling an area, hiding from enemies with full gear and guns.

Shot of a man down, and others helping him up to safety.

VO: Being part of the United States Army means more than just getting a job done. It’s about helping your fellow man and knowing when you need help, not only as a soldier, but as a person.
2 Men and Women of the Army lined up giving a salute. Camera pans down the line showing their faces. CPT Z: Well, there’s a stereotype that if you’re in the Army, that you’ve got to be a man, you’ve got to take care of your family.
3 Side profile shot of CPT Y speaking and sharing his comments. CPT Y: Most cases, most soldiers like to keep their own problems personal. When they do need help, having an open door and a sharing ear…
4 Front on shot of CPT Z speaking. CPT Z: It’s just listening to the soldier. I think it’s important that we recognize those soldiers that need help and try to break that barrier and let them know it’s okay to come forward and — and ask for the help that the Army can provide them.
5 CPT Y playing with his kids, wife, and animals. Smiling and having a good time as a man, not a soldier.

Then show CPT Y in a commanding position giving orders to a unit going through an obstacle course.

Then showing him teaching and leading a classroom discussion as the camera pans across the classroom showing attentive students.

CPT Y: One tool that — that I’ve used personally is I’ll share with a soldier that everything wasn’t always as it may appear. I may be a Commander, but I’m a man, I’m a husband, I’m a father, and I’ve — I’ve had — made my fair share of mistakes and had shortcomings. At the same time, somebody was always there to help me.

Every soldier wants to make his mark to either lead the team, be a part of the team.

And they have a confidence to understand that the unit will do all that’s possible to give that soldier all the support necessary.

6 Show an Army man speaking with a counselor. Then switch to the same man at an Army doctor with his wife. Then switch to the same man in a doctor’s tent on the battlefield with one of his fallen comrades. CPT Z: And only the Army could provide this type of help for their employees. It builds up a pride that “Hey, I like what I’m doing. I’m working for somebody that’s going to take care of me, that’s going to take care of my family, and they’ll take care of my battle buddies if they need help.”

There’s no other employer in the world that will — will support its employees like the Army does. We rally around the people that need the help.

7 Front shot of CPT Y speaking directly to the audience. CPT Y: It’s just a culture that once you put this uniform on, that you’re part of a family. And it’s a grand scheme of taking care of each other, leaving no man behind.
8 Show CPT Z speaking to the camera. CPT Z: And that saying, leave no man behind, it doesn’t just refer to when you’re on the battlefield. It refers to just as much when you’re back here at home station and your soldier needs help.
9 Panoramic shot of a canteen in which officers are going around to tables of men and women and talking, laughing, having a good time. CPT Y: Just knowing the unit is there, it gives them a security that somebody is going to be there, whether we’re passing the hat, bringing meals or just asking them how’s everything going in the family.
10 Show two men (you don’t know which is the officer and which is the subordinate) talking and shaking each other’s hands. CPT Z: And you don’t always have to talk to them from a Commander to a subordinate standpoint. You just talk to them man-to-man, and you learn a lot from your soldiers when you do that.
11 Show CPT Y speaking to the camera. CPT Y: Soldiers are the — are the heartbeat; that — they’re the pulse and they’re the tempo of that unit.
12 Show men and women on a run in their casual Army clothes through the woods. (The woods can be a metaphor for all of their dark secrets locked away in their hearts).

At “It is a…” switch back to a shot of CPT Z.

CPT Z: You’ve got to keep — keep them both mentally and physically healthy. And the physical part is usually the easiest way to keep them healthy. It’s — it’s the mental part — like I said before, breaking through that barrier of, you know, “I’m a man. I’m in the

Army. I don’t need help,” that’s the toughest part of keeping them mentally healthy.

It is a —

13 Shot of CPT Y.

At “So if…” show men and women helping each other do different tasks related to Army and military work.

At “There’s no such…” there is a family hugging and laughing together.

CPT Y: — Domino effect. Once one soldier receives help, he’s willing to help another soldier.

So if they’re willing to reach out that hand to help each other, it becomes contagious.

We actually, as Commanders, live for our soldiers as – as we do our own families.

There’s no such word as no when it comes to helping the family.

14 Here the same family as before is now suffering some sort of loss. (Fire, death, theft….etc.)

Show soldiers helping during a flood or fire to rebuild a fellow man’s home and life.

CPT Z: I’ve never seen a unit come together more than when a soldier or soldier’s family needs help.

We will drop training at the drop of a hat to – to help soldiers out and – and their families.

How do we do it. Well, we have the support of our family at home, but our unit is a family. And when one of them is in trouble, we all come to their aid.

15 Show CPT Y speaking. CPT Y: If a tasking is coming up or a duty coming up, that — it’s going to come regardless. We’ll find somebody that can — somebody else that can do it. And it’s not that you’re not healthy enough to do it or that you’re not capable of doing it; it’s the priority that your family and the needs of your family outweigh this simple task.

It’s an underlying trust that you build with your soldiers.

16 Show both CPT Y and CPT Z participating in instilling values into their subordinates either through classroom experiences, a drill, or helping in the community. (All three is there is time). CPT Y: As — as Captains in the U.S. Army, it’s a rank. But it’s also — you have to know what your charge is, and as you take that charge, you don’t just feed, you don’t just listen; you nurture. And what you’re going to nurture is that philosophy of the Army values. You’re going to nurture the philosophy of helping each other. You’re going to nurture the philosophy of teamwork.
17 CPT Y and CPT Z smiling and shaking hands and patting the backs of other Army recruits. CPT Y: Not everybody has a problem, but everybody can always use some help, whether it’s personal, professional. It’s only going to make you that much better as a leader.
18 Army logo in center of screen. VO: There’s strong. Then there’s Army strong.

CGriffith_IMC634_Week7

RadioShack Super Bowl Commercial 2014

Script: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaZKnNmd0dg

 

Video Audio
1. MAN 1 holding phone looking worried. MAN 2 behind him working at desk. MAN1: Ok.

MAN 2: What?

2. ZOOMING IN. MAN 1 hangs up phone and looks even more worried. Phone click.

MAN 1: The 80’s called. They want their store back.

3. WS of different characters from the 80’s come through the doorway with JASON and MARY LOU RETTON leading the way. They spread in different directions. “Working for the Weekend” by Loverboy plays all through panel 15.
4. CU shot of HULK HOGAN, DEE SNIDER, LLEWELYN PONCHERELLO, and CLIFF CLAVIN.
5. MARY LOU RETTON is stacking and taking VCRs while JASON is in the background hacking down a VCR sign with his machete. DEVO is also taking things off the walls. Sound of items being picked up and the sign being cut down.
6. KID and PLAY hands off devices to each other.
7. The three RAISINS knock over an old radio Small crash as radio falls
8. DEE SNIDER runs down an aisle with both arms outstretched knocking outdated technology like VCR, BETA MAX, old RADIOS, VIDEO CAMERAS, etc. off the shelves. Sound of everything being knocked off and hitting the floor
9. CU of BUBO from CLASH OF TITANS.
10. CU of TEEN WOLF taking stuff off shelves. DEE SNIDER and MARY LOU RETTON in background carrying things.
11. CHUCKY in the floor ripping up carpet. CHUCKY: Maniacal laughter
12. ALF taking down shelves. Shelf being torn down.
13. HULK HOGAN carrying table over head. HULK: (roar)
14. MARY LOU RETTON smiles and takes the phone that was used at the beginning of the commercial.
15. TEEN WOLF and another character run out the door carrying items while the DELOREAN from BACK TO THE FUTURE sits with items strapped to its roof in the middle of the screen. DOC: GO GO GO!

Wheel screeches.

16. WS of the two RADIO SHACK workers in the middle of the empty RADIO SHACK. ANNOUNCER: It’s time for a new Radio Shack.
17. Fast pan to the right of a new RADIO SHACK filled with BEATS headphones and other newer technology. Upbeat music begins to play.

ANNOUNCER: Come see what’s possible

18. CU of two guys (one RADIO SHACK WORKER and one CUSTOMER). WORKER showing CUSTOMER how to use phone to turn on a light. ANNOUNCER: when we do things together.
19. RADIO SHACK logo.

RADIOSHACK

Do. It. Together.

Goodbye 80’s RADIOSHACK

Twitter bird whitsle.

Old Spice 2013 Commercial

Script: First 30 seconds of this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PF_X3l3TnJs

Video Audio
1. Fast zoom in of bedroom. Ball of fire and smoke and TERRY CREWS appears from the ground in red boxers holding OLD SPICE SHAVING GEL. TERRY CREWS: (screaming) New Old Spice Shaving Gel is newer than a fresh pair of socks.
2. CU of night stand. Drawer flies open and two white socks pop out. (Swish noise)

SOCKS: Newer than a new jersey.

3. Same shot as before of TERRY CREWS holding the shaving gel in front of his bed. Looking confused and off to his left behind him. A yellow jersey pops up from behind the bed with the number 51 on it. (Swish noise)

JERSEY: Newer than a new mouse, baby.

MOUSE: Newer than an un-

4. CU of brown mouse in a mouse hole. MOUSE: opened gift from your stepmom.
5. TERRY CREWS CU looking confused around the room. TERRY CREWS: Everything’s talking.
6. CU of a blue and red wrapped present sitting on a white dresser. PRESENT: Newer than the waffle iron that’s inside me.
7. Zoom inside the box. CU of WAFFLE IRON inside box with a blue and red outline to show that it is inside the PRESENT. WAFFLE IRON: Newer than the new solar panels that were
8. TERRY CREWS looking up. WAFFLE IRON: installed on the roof
9. WS of house with SOLAR PANEL on roof talking. SOLAR PANEL: And I’m the newest thing there is.

TC BABY:You’re not as new

10. TERRY CREWS looks confused to his left. TC BABY :as me
11. TERRY CRUISE (TC) BABY in a basket. Baby noises.
11. TERRY CREWS picks up the baby and holds him up to an angelic light while all of the talking objects around the room look on. Angel noises

TERRY CREWS: I HAVE A SOOOO –

12. CU of TERRY CRUISE and the BABY. White gel comes out of the tip of the shaving bottle. TERRY CREWS: OOOOOOO –

Plop noise.

13. TERRY CRUISE, BABY, and all objects get sucked in the can. Getting sucked into a can noise.

TERRY CREWS: OOON!

14. All other noises stop and the can drops to the floor in a WS shot of the room. Plop noise.
15. White shaving cream all around and TERRY CREWS’ head pops out of the left.

OLD SPICE written to the right.

Razor shaves down TERRY CREWS’ fave revealing the new shaving gel.

The shaving gel spins around revealing the caption:

Download this to your face.

Gloop noise.

TERRY CREWS: What else is new?!

Scrape noise.

OLD SPICE whistle. (WHOOSH)

Epling’s Service Center

The Focus

The focus of this business is to service vehicles of people in the community in a timely and efficient manner, all the while building relationships with these people in the community. The video will focus on the services offered and the relationships built. It will be launched via YouTube and promote through a newly created Facebook page because this business is not currently online.

The Issues

This company was started by Harold Eugene “Sonny” Eplin in 1983 in Hernshaw, WV and was run out of his personal garage and home. It is still run out of the same location today and has attracted many local customers. Potential negatives could be limited operation hours, only local publicity (if any), and competitor service centers located less than 10-15 minutes away in Kanawha City, WV and Charleston, WV.

The Audience

The audience for this video will be people in the local Kanawha/Boone County areas in West Virginia who are in need of vehicle services and are looking for a more personal level of interaction.

The Content Points

The main content points of this business are:

Integrity
Hard Work
Trustworthiness

The Brand

Epling’s Service Center is where your car goes.

CGriffith_IMC634_Week2

This paper illustrates three great videos that do not showcase the product immediately, but keep the viewer’s attention until the end, making the product unforgettable.

In the past week and a half, a third party client leaked thousands of supposedly deleted SnapChat images, many of which contained child pornography. SnapChat claims that there was no breach in their security system and that these leaks did happen through an illegal (unnamed) third-party application. SnapChat was reported making this statement:

“…any application that isn’t ours but claims to offer Snapchat services violates our Terms of Use and can’t be trusted.”

In their Terms of Use Policy, it is clearly outlined that such third-party applications are illegal.

  • Develop any third-party applications that interact with User Content or the Services without our prior written consent; and
  • Use the Services for any illegal or unauthorized purpose or engage in, encourage, or promote any activity that violates these Terms.

You further agree to abide by any third-party terms that apply when posting reviews of Snapchat, including the iTunes App Store Terms of Service and/or the Android Market Terms of Service. Posting Snapchat usernames in app store reviews is strictly prohibited and may result in the deletion of your Snapchat account.

The legality of this issue is clearly defined throughout their Terms of Use Policy. Many other applications have similar policies. Sharing of personal and public information is not something new, but it is definitely becoming more and more used in our daily lives. I personally believe that sharing information with someone, if it is your will and want, is no problem. As long as both parties agree to it and are both legal in age and content, then it is fine. The problems arise when, like The Snappening, users violate the terms and conditions of the application’s agreement and in turn illegal and immoral information and data are leaked and shared with those who were never meant to see them.

SnapChat also has a clause in their Terms of Use Policy that states that users have the right and ownership to their photos, videos, and other generated content that they have created, HOWEVER it is also stated that SnapChat has the right to use this data and content in any way to help promote their business. This is sometimes another legal issue that arises when sharing on mobile devices. Though you do technically own the photos and content, whoever comes in contact with this content can use them, legally or illegally, in different ways across different media. It seems that no matter how many Terms of Agreement, Use, Privacy Polies are created, they seem to always get broken in one way or another, whether the user means to or not.

There have been several other similar instances such as The Fappening (when several nude celebrity photos were leaked from the iCloud) and BYOD (Bring Your Own Device). BYOD is a program that many businesses are introducing to increase productivity and decrease cost. In this program employees use their own personal devices for work related purposes. Legal issues arise when the data on these phones are compromised and can become public knowledge, if the user is “actually” consenting to an agreed upon terms and conditions statement, where the data is at any given time throughout the company, etc.

Have any of you ever heard of the BYOD program or even used it? How has it worked, or how do you think it would help improve/decrease productivity. Here is a link to a paper on legal issues within these types of programs: http://www.sans.org/reading-room/whitepapers/legal/legal-issues-corporate-bring-device-programs-34060

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